20
/news-archive/New-Audiovisual-citation-guidelines.php

New Audiovisual citation guidelines

New Audiovisual citation guidelines were published today by the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC). The guidelines cover film; television programmes; radio programmes; audio recordings; DVD extras; clips; trailers; adverts; idents; non broadcast, amateur and archive material; podcasts; vodcasts and games.

From the BUFVC presss release http://bufvc.ac.uk/2013/03/27/audiovisual-citation-guidelines-launched-today:

In the era of YouTube, podcasts and vidcasts new pioneering guidelines, launched today, will be crucial for students, researchers and academics when they cite moving image and sound sources, or provide advice on referencing them.

The British Universities Film & Video Council’s (BUFVC) guidelines respond to the 2011 Jisc report, Film and Sound in Higher and Further Education: A Progress Report with Ten Strategic Recommendations.

The report found that despite the exponential increase in the use of audiovisual material in teaching, learning and research in higher and further education, existing guidelines for the referencing of moving image and sound are often insufficient as they are based on standards developed for the written word. This has the effect of discouraging the citing of moving image and sound, as well as creating barriers in its discovery, use and reuse.

Professor John Ellis, professor of media arts, University of London: “Citation exists so that youcan find the source of any quotation. The rules have long since been worked out for print sources. However, for moving image and sound, no one quite knows what to do, so references are usually imprecise and sometimes left out completely. This guide now makes it possible for any writer (even a student) to lead their readers to the exact audiovisual source they are discussing. It might seem a simple problem to solve, until you realise that there are a multitude of different types of audiovisual source!”

The guidelines can be downloaded from http://bufvc.ac.uk/projects-research/avcitation/guidelines

New Audiovisual citation guidelines

New Audiovisual citation guidelines were published today by the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC). The guidelines cover film; television programmes; radio programmes; audio recordings; DVD extras; clips; trailers; adverts; idents; non broadcast, amateur and archive material; podcasts; vodcasts and games.

From the BUFVC presss release http://bufvc.ac.uk/2013/03/27/audiovisual-citation-guidelines-launched-today:

In the era of YouTube, podcasts and vidcasts new pioneering guidelines, launched today, will be crucial for students, researchers and academics when they cite moving image and sound sources, or provide advice on referencing them.

The British Universities Film & Video Council’s (BUFVC) guidelines respond to the 2011 Jisc report, Film and Sound in Higher and Further Education: A Progress Report with Ten Strategic Recommendations.

The report found that despite the exponential increase in the use of audiovisual material in teaching, learning and research in higher and further education, existing guidelines for the referencing of moving image and sound are often insufficient as they are based on standards developed for the written word. This has the effect of discouraging the citing of moving image and sound, as well as creating barriers in its discovery, use and reuse.

Professor John Ellis, professor of media arts, University of London: “Citation exists so that youcan find the source of any quotation. The rules have long since been worked out for print sources. However, for moving image and sound, no one quite knows what to do, so references are usually imprecise and sometimes left out completely. This guide now makes it possible for any writer (even a student) to lead their readers to the exact audiovisual source they are discussing. It might seem a simple problem to solve, until you realise that there are a multitude of different types of audiovisual source!”

The guidelines can be downloaded from http://bufvc.ac.uk/projects-research/avcitation/guidelines